Education Library Service wins Ofsted approval!

We are thrilled to report that the Faculty of Education PGCE programme has just received an Outstanding rating from Ofsted – and the Faculty Library Service has been singled out for praise by inspectors.

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The Ofsted Team found that the Library Service is “firmly at the heart of the Faculty” and central to the academic life of PGCE trainees. Library staff were delighted to be recognised as a “team of highly professional, dedicated librarians” who work “closely with subject lecturers to ensure that trainees have access to relevant and up-to-date literature”.

Inspectors spoke to us in detail over the course of their visits and received glowing comments about our service from the PGCE trainees, so it was particularly pleasing to see the report really reflecting how central the Library Service is to the Faculty and to the success of our teacher education programme. We liaise closely with academic staff, but our own in-depth understanding of the course (from assignment criteria and deadlines to the timing of teaching placements) and our specialist knowledge of Education, is also key to ensuring the trainees receive a high quality, relevant service.

The finding that “Knowledgeable librarians provide trainees with precise guidance and support” sums up precisely what we aim to do: the team not only supports trainees in person but also via the Library Moodle Site, where we curate course-specific information and electronic resources relevant to each assignment, together with interactive reading lists. This support – though it isn’t as visible as our work within the Library – is just as crucial, as trainees spend at least 120 days on placement in schools all over East Anglia and rely on this ‘virtual’ library service when completing their academic work.

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We’ve come up with other ways to make sure our service helps trainees while on placement: we offer loan periods for the duration of the course, for example, so trainees don’t have to worry about renewing or returning books whilst they are learning to teach.  Our ‘No Fines‘ policy also contributes to their positive experience of the Education Library Service and their well-being: we think learning to manage a class of 4 or 14-year-olds presents enough challenges!

We also offer a ‘search & collect’ service (think Tesco but with resources not groceries) so that trainees can email or text while on school placement and ask for items to be put aside for collection in the evenings after school. When they’re in the Faculty they have quick and easy access to physical resources as we make sure academic texts, classroom-teaching resources and professional magazines are all shelved together in curriculum subject sections.

The Library Team tailors information literacy skills training to specific PGCE assignments to help trainees quickly turn theory into practice.  We also provide follow-up one-to-one study support in person and online step-by-step guides on the Library Moodle Site. We’re delighted that the inspectors noted that “Consequently, trainees are very well supported in their academic research as well as in their teaching practice.”

If there’s a secret to our success here, we think it’s the fact that our location within the Faculty and close relationships with academic staff and students allows us to offer a highly tailored, dedicated service to our officially Outstanding PGCE trainees, the teachers of tomorrow.

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New in the Library – Top Picks!

Our top picks of new books available in the Education Library this week!

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Adoniou, M. (2016) Spelling it out. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Found in the Education Library, 428/1 ADO

 

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Southall, Ed. (2017). Yes, but why? : teaching for understanding in mathematics. London: SAGE.

Found in the Education Library, 510/7 SOU

 

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Lu, M. (2018). Wildcard. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons.

Found in the Education Library, LU

 

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Nava, A., & Pedrazzini, L. (2018). Second language acquisition in action : principles from practice. London: Bloomsbury.

Found in the Education Library, 407 NAV

 

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Woods, P., & Roberts, A. (2018). Collaborative school leadership : a critical guide. London: SAGE.

Found in the Education Library, 371/2 WOO

 

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Wolf, M., & Stoodley, C. (2018). Reader, come home : the reading brain in the digital world. New York: Harper.

Found in the Education Library, 428 WOL

Top Tips – searching for a book on iDiscover #4 Finding your book in the Education Library Part 2

To access iDiscover please click here. You can also access iDiscover through the Library Moodle site here.

Tip

Once you have found the book you need on iDiscover you will want to track down the title in the Library. Today we will highlight some of the locations your title might be in.

Let’s take a look at the book page on iDiscover…

 

Main Library

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Circled in red in the screen shot above, you can see that before the book classmark it says ‘Main Library’. That means this title will be located in the main collection of the Library and will have a white label on the spine. Also circled in red is the book availability, which says that the Library has one copy of the book and it is not on loan.

Other locations will include…


Educational Resources

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If this is the location of the title you are searching for, then it will be on the main shelves of the Library on the Lower Ground Floor and will have a yellow spine label. Educational Resources are items that could be useful to use in a classroom to aid teaching and include other items that are not just books!

All yellow label items are shelved in sequence after white label titles.


Reference Collection

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Titles in the Reference Collection are located on the main shelves of the Library and have a green label (notice that the classmark starts with a ‘R’). These books are for reference only and can not be borrowed. Some books in the Reference Collection are in their own section near the steps by the Welcome Desk. Some Reference books are located on the main shelves at the end of a section they are relevant to. If you aren’t sure where to look just ask one of the friendly Librarians at the Welcome Desk.


Temporary Reference Collection

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Books that are in the Temporary Reference Collection are located behind the Welcome Desk in the Library.  To access these titles you will need to ask one of the Librarians for the title you are after. These books can only be used in the Library and are not borrowable.

 


RS (Rolling Stacks)

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Any titles that come up with ‘(RS)’ at the end of the classmark are located in a closed off part of the Library. These books are ‘Available on request’, which means you will need to ask one of the Librarians to fetch it for you.

 


Archive

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To access ‘Reference Archive material’ you will need to ask one of the Librarians at the Welcome Desk. These books have historical significance and are in our archive. These titles are for reference only and can only be used in the Library.

 

For more information on using iDiscover take a look at the iDiscover LibGuide here.

Top Tips – Searching for a book on iDiscover #3 Finding your book in the Education Library Part 1

To access iDiscover please click here. You can also access iDiscover through the Library Moodle site here.

Tip

Once you have clicked on the book you want from your results list how do you know where to find it in the Library? The information you need is circled below:

classmark

Once you are in the Education Library you need to go to the Lower Ground Floor and find the bay labelled 370/1.  Items within that sequence are then shelved alphabetically by the three letter code so look for HEI.  These are usually, but not always, the first three letters of the author’s name.

For more information on using iDiscover take a look at the iDiscover LibGuide here.

Trick or Treat? Our top 5 Halloween reads

Get into the spooky spirit with our top 5 Halloween reads.

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Nightmares : Poems to trouble your sleep by Jack Prelutsky, illustrated by Arnold Lobel

A collection of 12 delightfully creepy poems covering a cast of classic halloween characters from bogeymen to witches. Accompanied by gruesome full page black and white illustrations, it is sure to delight children and adults alike.

Find this in the poetry section on the ramp to the lower floor under PRELUTSKY.

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The Singing Bones by Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan’s unusual style comes to life in this illustrated series of Grimm’s Fairy Tales. 75 eerie sculptures that each reflect the dark spirit of a tale are photographed and accompanied by short, brutal reworkings of an extract from the original text. Don’t forget to check out the signed orignal prints included in our copy!

Find this in the fairy tales section on the ramp to the lower floor under TAN.

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The Widow’s Broom by Chris Van Allsburg

A short tale with haunting illustrations, The Widow’s Broom tells the story of a widow who comes into possession of a witches broom and together they form a friendship. But will she save it from the persecution of the wicked villagers?

Find this in the children’s literature section on the lower floor under VAN ALLSBURG.

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Doll Bones by Holly Black

The power of creative play takes an unusual twist in this spellbinding book about a doll who is not all she seems.

Find this in the children’s literature section on the lower floor under BLACK.

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Chris Riddell

Imagine living in a graveyard being raised by ghosts, what tales would you have to tell? Follow orphan Bod in this Carnegie medal winning book on a series of fantastical adventures.

Find this in the children’s literature section on the lower floor under GAIMAN.

Come and explore our collection (if you dare!)….